Does !TeX => bad maths?

Whilst browsing the writeLaTeX twitter feed the other day, I came across an interesting observation that the absence of TeX is a good indicator that a math paper has issues, highlighted by John Cook (@TeXtip) in this tweet:

In the original blog post on this (entitled ‘Ten Signs a Claimed Mathematical Breakthrough is Wrong’), this is only one of a number of points made, although it is the first, and is accompanied by the interesting statistic that:

“This simple test (suggested by Dave Bacon) already catches at least 60% of wrong mathematical breakthroughs.”

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My first set of WriteLaTeX how-to videos

London is certainly keeping me busy, so it’s a very short post today simply to help disseminate the three ‘how-to’ videos I’ve recently produced for writeLaTeX:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PL0KP0KSTjc2Pr0wU46IW7z0-oUOtNDctO&showinfo=1]

If you’re using writeLaTeX and have any feedback, please let me know (@DrHammersley).

Google Docs for Science – a short introduction to WriteLaTeX

 

Most of the world’s technological and medical innovations began with a scientific paper — there are now over two million scientific papers published every year, and many more technical reports and presentations. As scientists, we spend a lot of time writing, reviewing and publishing these papers, and whilst the Internet has drastically improved how they’re published and distributed, writing (and collaborating) is still difficult. With WriteLaTeX we’re helping to change that.

WriteLaTeX is a real-time collaborative writing platform which lets you create, edit & share your scientific ideas easily online using LaTeX, a powerful tool for scientific publishing. My co-founder John Lees-Miller created writeLaTeX to address the problems we experienced ourselves when writing papers collaboratively, in particular in the fields of mathematics, physics and computer science. We both have backgrounds in mathematics so naturally used LaTeX but when working with co-authors in different countries and different disciplines, there was no easy solution – so John created one!

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